5 Ways Email Impacts Your Thoughts and Emotions

RethinkCare logo
RethinkEd logo
RethinkBH For Providers logo
RethinkBH For Health Plans logo

By: Emma Seppala, PhD

People using mobile phones in a busy city street

Share with your community

Facebook
Twitter
LinkedIn

Have you noticed that checking your email impacts how you think and feel? It does so in 5 important ways. Here’s your brain on email:

Stress

Have you ever been in a situation in which you were feeling great until you received an email out of the blue that completely upset your day? How does it feel to receive 30 such emails first thing in the morning? There’s a reason why: Research shows that just looking through your inbox can significantly increase your stress levels  (see research described here).

Why is this? Let’s start by defining stress. Stress is the experience of having too great a task to accomplish with too few resources to meet the demand. In the past, for our ancestors, this stress might have looked like meeting a hungry wild animal in the jungle. Today, however, it takes on a much more simple – yet equally powerful form – an inbox. Email overload is just another way in which we experience that there is too great a task (the huge list of to-do’s) to handle. In the study mentioned above, email overload had a lot to do with the stress response as measured psychologically and physiologically through heart rate, blood pressure and a measure of cortisol (the “stress hormone”).

Well-Being

Is it just the amount of emails that lead to stress though? There’s another element that we are forgetting. The emotional impact of each email.  Think about it, usually, in our email-less past, we would experience maybe 1 highly emotional event a day or maybe 2 or 3 at the most e.g. a confrontation with a colleague, perhaps a spat with a spouse, and/or a phone call from an angry neighbor. Our stress response is evolved to handle and recover from a small number of stressful situations but not a whole host of them.   Unless we live in unusually extreme situations such as warzones, for example, our life usually doesn’t have frequent and sequential stressors thrown at us.

Today, however, just sitting down at our desk to check our email with a cup of coffee can bring on a deluge of emotional assailants. Between 30-300 different emotional stimuli are delivered to you within the span of minutes. From an email from your boss asking you to complete a task urgently, to a passive-aggressive message from a family-member, to news from a colleague that he’s out sick and you have to take over his workload. One hour of email can take you through a huge range of emotions and stressors. Sure, you can get happy emails too – photos of your nephews, someone’s marriage announcement – but unfortunately, research on the negativity bias shows that our brain clings more to the negative and they don’t always balance out (but there are ways which is why I wrote The Happiness Track).

Emotional Intelligence

That’s when our emotional intelligence is impacted. We know that when our stress response is activated, the parts of our brain that respond with fear of anxiety tend to take over, weakening our ability to make rational choices and to reason logically (see this study). You may be stressed, what’s more, your own ability to respond appropriately is impacted. We know that our emotions impact the way we act. You’re going to reply with a different tone if you’re upset (even at someone other than your email recipient) than if you’re not. (But kindness and altruism is what actually makes you successful, as Christopher Kukk’s new book The Compassionate Achiever argues).

Self-Control

Have you ever pressed “send” only to regret it moments later? Don’t blame yourself. Research  shows that getting depleted because you have too much on your plate reduces your self-control. For example, it can make you take more risks when maybe you should be more cautious (e.g. this study). It’s harder to have a say over our impulses when there’s just too much going on. As in too many emails, with too many different messages leading to increased stress and emotional overload.

Productivity

When you’re doing a million emails – all about different topics and requesting you for different things, you are, by definition in a situation of overwhelmed multitasking. And multitasking, research shows, leads to lower productivity and makes you lose a lot of time out of our day! Plus your creativity takes a dip – you are most innovative when you are not stressed and overwhelmed, argues Scott Kaufman, author of Wired to Create.

So what’s the answer to the assailment of email on our lives?

Before you contemplate moving to a farm, selling your smartphone on Ebay, raising chickens and goats and cutting technology out of your life forever despite your love of selfies – WAIT there’s a solution. Think about it, email didn’t exist 10 years ago! That means that there is a way to undo the madness. Whether it’s setting up specific times to do email or removing email from your phone, taking a dedicated tech fast on weekends and evenings or setting autoresponders, you do have control over how much you let email take over your brain.

This article was originally published on Dr. Seppala’s website here.

Share with your community

Facebook
Twitter
LinkedIn
Sign up for our Newsletter

Subscribe to our monthly newsletter on the latest industry updates, Rethink happenings, and resources galore. Simply follow the link to the footer and enter your email.

Related Resources

Podcast
  About this Podcast Episode On this episode, Angela and Kristin invite a guest, Pasha...
NEW YORK, Nov. 21, 2022 /PRNewswire/ — RethinkFirst, the leading software and solutions provider in behavioral health, today...
Podcast
  About this Podcast Episode On this episode, Angela and Kristin discuss setting realistic expectations...

Learn more about Rethink

African American male and Caucasian woman working on laptop drinking coffee
RethinkCare logo

Take care of your people with RethinkCare’s evidenced-based solutions that support the well-being your entire employee base in all aspect of their lives - from personal to parenting, and professional

For Employers ›
School learning with diverse middle school students
RethinkEd logo

Build strong school communities and healthy, safe learning environments for all your students with RethinkEd’s evidence-based strategies and technology solutions across SEL, Special Ed, Behavioral & Training

For Educators >
Doctor helping girl with psycho pedagogical intervention
RethinkBH For Providers logo

Start, grow and manage your practice with Rethink’s workflow automation and evidenced-based clinical best practice tools that help you optimize outcomes and operations

For Providers >
African American women talking while seated
RethinkBH For Health Plans logo

Support your members and your provider networks with Rethink’s solutions that support autism care management across your network while offering unique value-added services to your members.

For Health Plans >
logo rethinkfirst white

Together We’re Powering Potential

Transforming the Behavioral Health landscape requires scalable platforms that address a broad range of mental, emotional, and wellness needs. At Rethink First we are proud to work across the continuum of care to help individuals and the people they care about live healthier, happier and more fulfilling lives.

New call-to-action

The leading behavioral and mental health enterprise platform to support working parents, caregivers and their families.

For Employers ›
New call-to-action

Award-winning solutions empower districts and their educators to improve outcomes and wellness for all tiers of students and to build healthy and safe learning environments.

For Educators >
New call-to-action

Fully integrated workflow automation and evidenced-based clinical tools help behavioral health organizations optimize outcomes and operations.

For Providers >
New call-to-action

Patent-pending clinical solutions and member engagement services streamline autism care management processes and support outcomes for health plans, providers, and members.

For Health Plans >